What is Common Property?

Common property is all the areas of the land and building not included in any lot. It is jointly owned by all owners, and the owners corporation is responsible for its management. The lot and common property will be defined on your individual strata plan. However, common property boundaries of each lot are generally formed by:

  • the upper surface of the floor (but not including carpet)
  • the under surface of the ceiling
  • all external or boundary walls (including doors and windows).

Generally common property includes:

  • floors including a ramp or stairway
  • boundary walls including any door, window or other structure within the wall and their working parts
  • ceramic tiles originally attached to a common property surface (eg. the floor or boundary wall)
  • pipes in the common property or servicing more than one lot
  • electrical wiring in the common property or servicing more than one lot
  • parquet and floor boards originally installed
  • vermiculite ceilings, plaster ceilings and cornices
  • magnesite finishes on the floor
  • balcony walls and doors are usually common property if the strata plan was registered after 1 July 1974 (you must look at the registered strata plan)
  • the slab dividing two storeys of the same lot, or one storey from an open space roof area or garden areas of a lot (eg. a townhouse or villa), is usually common property if the strata plan was registered after 1 July 1974, unless the registered strata plan says it is not.

In addition structural cubic space is usually common property unless the registered strata plan shows that it forms part of the lot.

Structural cubic space includes:

  • any pipes, wires, cables or ducts that are not for the enjoyment of a single lot
  • any cubic space enclosed by a structure enclosing any of these pipes, wires, cables or ducts.

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